#HEALTHYHAPPYBODY: HOW TO STAY MOTIVATED & ACHIEVE YOUR FITNESS GOALS

With summer weather finally arriving, along with the inevitable “Beach Body” inspo barraging our social media feeds, you’re probably feeling the pressure to work out now more than ever.

Because the health benefits of exercise are numerous – including improved strength and mobility, better sleep, and increased levels of energy and happiness – everyone knows they should start a workout program; however, sticking to one is a whole other story. It’s pretty common to go out and buy the new Lulu pants, the Nikes sneakers, and the Hydro Flash Double Insulated Water Bottle, only to sputter out on your new exercise routine within a week or two and resume your go-to position on the couch.

I get it. The couch is super comfy. Give me the newest House of Cards season with a glass of red, and I’ll snuggle up right next to you. But no matter how inviting your couch is, deep down inside (maybe wayyyyy deep down inside), you really want long-lasting change when it comes to improving your fitness.

What’s preventing you from achieving your goals comes down to the big M word: Motivation. Unfortunately, you cannot take a swig of motivation and victoriously push your way through the finish line. More often than not, a tweaked mindset and a few simple tools fuel motivation. Below are a few easy practices that have helped me and my clients stay on track to achieve our individual fitness goals.

  1. Know Your “Why”

Knowing why you want to start working out is key for sticking it out. Your why has to be YOURS and yours alone, so it helps to get really clear and super specific with it. Is it to increase your energy because you’ve got two babies under the age of two that you need to keep up with? Is it for a health reason, like depression?

Your why has to serve your highest good, and it should reflect how you want to FEEL. That means, don’t work out to get a Kardashian/Jenner ass, or abs like J. Lo. Those ego-inflated reasons often leave you frustrated, dissatisfied, and ultimately listless. Once you get crystal clear with your why, you’re able to easily navigate around obstacles and naysayers and create the healthy lifestyle you desire.

  1. Schedule a Regular Workout Time

Most committed exercisers get up really early or work out at night (usually once the kids are in bed). I do both, but I prefer exercising first thing in the morning. That way my workout is out of the way and I am able to enjoy the rest of my day without worrying how to “squeeze” in a sweat session.

No matter what time you choose, commit to it like your life depends on it. Schedule a 45-60 minute workout into your weekly planner like it’s the interview for your dream job. Not committing to a regular workout time makes it really easy to forget it or make up excuses to skip it for something “more important.” But honestly, there’s nothing more important than your health and sense of well-being. Right?

  1. Set a Goal

There’s no better feeling than achieving a goal. Whether you’d like to complete a 5K run or fit into your skinny jeans, having a goal is an awesome way to stay motivated. Once you define your goal, plan a realistic schedule for it that also includes celebrating the small milestones throughout your journey.

Often times big goals take upwards of a year to accomplish, which can feel so daunting that you might want to give up mid-way. NOOOOOO! This is why if you plan for a sweet mini-reward halfway through your progress (like a weekend spa vacation), you’ll be less likely to throw in the towel.

  1. Make it Fun

Exercise can be fun. Seriously. Of course it all depends on your attitude, but it also helps if you spice up your exercise routine. Whether you join a barre or boxing class, or trade in the treadmill for a trail run, mixing up your routine will keep it both effective and enjoyable – which means you’ll be less likely to stop it.

Remember: make sure to do activities that interest YOU. For example, if you hate Pilates but are paying for a Pilates class because you read Miley Cyrus does Pilates, then for the love of Malibu, skip the Pilates class. It’s important to do activities that you really love so that you’ll be having sooo much fun you won’t feel like you’re working out at all!

  1. Make it Cost You $$$

Shameless plug? Maybe. But, let’s put it this way: if you’ve already shelled out some bucks to a personal trainer, you’ll be less inclined to stay in with pizza and America’s Got Talent and more motivated to hit the gym as you’d originally planned. Plus, a personal trainer is not only paid to create routines for you (so you can turn your brain off and not get overwhelmed with equipment), but she’s also there to motivate you with tons of support and affirmations – especially when the going gets tough. It’s an investment that will pay off in more ways than one. You’re worth it!

Brianne Hogan is a contributing writer for She Does the City and a personal trainer and healthy eating coach in the GTA. You can follow her on Instagram and Facebook and check out her free Beginner’s 4 Week At-Home Workout series here.

Read the original article here.

Starting Out: Jogging

So you’ve decided to start jogging for the first time – congratulations! Jogging is an excellent way of boosting your mood, increasing your movement and keeping your weight under control.

But before you load up a running playlist on your phone and bolt out the door, first take some advice gleaned from jogging experts that may help you start on the right foot.

Here’s how to avoid the common rookie mistakes people make when picking up jogging for the first time.

Let out the doubt
“New joggers usually worry about how they compare to other people, and how they might look and be perceived,” says Heather Gardner, founder of Toronto’s Tribe Fitness. She advises to come to the experience of jogging “from a place that is personal versus worrying about others and what others think.”

Remember, feeling self-conscious is normal when starting a new activity, but it shouldn’t hold you back from becoming the best person you can be.

“Once upon a time, if someone would have said: ‘Luis you will be a runner in the future’, I would have literally laughed in their face.  I never pictured myself to be a runner,” says Luis Cabrera, a runner of 10 years, who is now a Nike Ambassador. “I always had this idea in my head that runners were these fit people that had been running all their life. I was wrong! Runners come in all shapes and sizes.  I’ve seen older people come out for the first time and seeing that motivates me.”

Don’t over-do it
New joggers tend to go all out, too soon. But pushing past the point of exhaustion and racking up too many kilometres can lead to injury and setbacks.

“By jumping into it without stretching and warming up properly, joggers risk injury or they can be very sore afterwards and so they won’t be able to run again for that week,” says Colin Matchim, head coach of Ajax Boxing Club, which will hinder their progress. Adopting a pre-workout warmup and stretch, followed by a post-workout stretch, is a good way to combat injuries from occurring.

Fuel your body
Also dangerous to a new jogger? Not eating or drinking enough. “A lot of people don’t realize the importance of proper nourishment and hydration before the start of run and quickly find out why it’s a bad idea not to be prepared,” says Matchim. “Stay hydrated throughout the day before you run and make sure you eat properly — but not within 45 minutes of your jog.”

Use the right shoes
New joggers can also suffer from repeat use injury, like shin splints, if they are not wearing the appropriate gear. “Many people are worried about sore knees and hips when jogging,” says Garner. “But with the proper program and attire, like running shoes, those injuries don’t generally happen.” So, go ahead and splurge on those new sneakers – it will be well worth it!

Have a plan and stick to it
Without a plan in place, many new joggers might begin to feel overwhelmed. Whether you are starting on a treadmill, a trail, or on the road, it’s important to find a route that feels comfortable for you, and to stick with it.

Gardner recommends finding a plan online from a reliable resource, or joining a class like the Learn to Run program at Tribe Fitness, a run/walk progression that requires no past running experience. “It is all about breaking it down into small accessible pieces,” she says. “So the program is broken down into small jog and walk chunks. You jog for one minute and walk for two minutes. The time slowly changes and the increments slowly morph throughout the program between jogging and walking. It is finding a program for the beginner jogger and giving them something that they can follow along.”

For those who are going it alone, Matchim suggests picking a route and timing yourself. “Setting goals within the route is always a good idea,” he says. “Jog to a pre-set landmark before you stop, and then on the day, you jog to another landmark.  Improving your time is another measurable method of tracking your improvement.” For example, see how it long it takes you to jog around the block one week, and compare it to your time for the next week.

Don’t go it alone
A great way to keep motivated with your new routine is finding a jogging buddy.

“When you know your friend is waiting for you in the park or on the corner, you won’t stand them up. You are going to go,” says Gardner, who recommends finding friends who have similar fitness goals. “The people who you are surrounded with impact what you do, including fitness and hobbies. I think finding like-minded people in your community who want to do what you want to do is key.” She suggests beginner joggers connect with others by joining a running program or finding a coach. Gardner also says that posting your fitness goals on social media, like Facebook or Connect is another way to stay accountable. “Post something like, ‘Hey, I just started this new jogging program. Ask me how it is going!’ Because people will ask you how it is going. Enrolling people will keep you accountable to your goals.”

Jogging can be a great addition to your fitness routine, or a terrific start of your new healthier you. Like everything else in life, you need to commit to it in order to be successful,” says Cabrera. “Jogging is one of those things that takes work and dedication.”

Read the original article on the Weight Watchers Canada website.

Boxing classes taught me so much more than a right jab

Last January, I became one of those people — one of the many people who join a gym as soon as the remnants of the holidays have been devoured and digested, and almost instantly regretted. Because I work from home and despise the winter, I decided I needed to leave the house. And because I had indulged in a number of regretted but enjoyed proseccos and tiny quiches basically every day for a month, I decided I also wanted Gigi Hadid’s abs.

Boxing was something that had interested me on and off throughout the years because I knew it would be unlike any of my Tracy Anderson or Ballet Beautiful DVDs. It would be demanding and essentially kick my derriere — something I knew I needed on both a fitness and a personal level. So I decided to join a boxing gym.

A year later, and I’m still working out at the same boxing gym. Not only did I stick with my New Year’s fitness intentions (I’m all about setting intentions rather than making resolutions), but I also learned a lot about myself throughout the process.

If you’re considering taking on a new activity or sport in 2017 as part of your New Year’s fitness intentions, here are some words of wisdom I can pass on that I learned from my year of taking boxing classes.

You are stronger (physically, mentally, emotionally) than you think

I’m gonna be real: Boxing is hard work. Learning combinations and throwing punches is challenging — especially when you have as little upper-body strength as I do. I mean, prior to boxing, I found opening a jar of pickles sweat-inducing.

Suffice it to say it didn’t come easily to me, and I hated that. I like things that come easily because I also hate doing things “wrong.” There were so many times when my inner perfectionist wanted to quit, but I knew on a very visceral, life-changing level that I couldn’t bob and weave myself out of this test. I would have to, literally, muscle through it.

More: Women’s fitness: Get lean, mean results with boxing

That’s not to say I loved every minute of boxing. I most definitely didn’t. But I soon learned to love the challenge of it, and soon I was finding success in the smallest of victories, whether it was successfully memorizing a combo or doing 15 push-ups without stopping. I discovered that I was a lot stronger — physically, mentally and emotionally — than I had given myself credit for.

Lesson learned: Keep pushing through because the reward of conquering old fears, thinking and patterns is priceless.

You are more than an outdated label for yourself

I can’t remember a time when I didn’t identify myself as an artist. In high school, I lived in my bedroom, writing stories. Throughout my 20s, I was a struggling actor, putting on plays in black box theatres (read: fancy basements). Now, I make my living from freelance writing, while I dabble in screenwriting on the side.

Despite being an avid exerciser for most of my life, I never thought of myself as a “jock.” To me, jocks were greased-up bodybuilders or those show-offs who always placed first at high school track and field while I was rewarded with a participation ribbon. Even bendy yogis who thrived on green juice and macrobiotic diets were more athletic than little ol’ me.

But by pushing and persevering through boxing class — by being able to both keep up and compete with some of the top athletes in class — I realized that I was actually athletic.

Boxing forced me to admit — to give — to myself this vital side of me that I had denied and suppressed due to an old (and, let’s be honest, probably toxic) belief that I was only “artsy” and not ever a “jock.” Embracing this new me has pushed me to finishing my first-ever 10K race, as well as pursuing an entirely different career path as a personal trainer.

Lesson learned: Don’t restrict yourself from evolving and growing into your true potential based on who you thought you were or what you believed about yourself so many years ago. Believe that you can be this and that and so much more — and you will be!

You are a kickass woman, inside and out

Like many women, I have struggled with my fair share of self-esteem issues. Boxing forced me out of my physical comfort zone, which in turn, helped me to love and appreciate my body more. Now I see my thighs and butt as something awesome because of their powerful abilities rather than something to be so critical and judgmental of whilst in a poorly lit changing room.

Lesson learned: Be a body-appreciative person rather than a body-cognizant person, and remember you are not alone in your journey.

Oh, and one more thing: I did end up getting those Gigi abs, after all.

 

To read the entire article, go to SheKnows.com where it was originally published.

It’s OK to Rest, Girl.

This is a picture of a stubborn woman who has finally thrown in the towel and is resting her bod. Fuck. I don’t like resting. I especially don’t like resting when I have a 10k coming up in four days. But here we are: sweaty, messy hair, days old pajamas, in bed, resting with a head cold. I fought against it initially, as I usually do. Went hard at boxing class on Monday, throwing a middle finger at the cold virus. I talked myself up to running 5k last night… only to collapse in bed at 5pm, bury myself under the covers and watched Riverdale instead. I don’t like giving in and giving up. But I’m learning that resting is actually anything but that. Resting is a GOOD thing. It’s the body’s way of telling us that we’ve been going too hard, neglecting our needs — physically, emotionally, spiritually — and often times the resting time is used for us to gather our energy for the next big phase/movement/change in our lives. It’s like our body is this amazing fortune 🔮 teller who knows what’s in store for us, so it’s all, “Shut up and go to sleep because if you knew what’s around the bend, you’ll be glad you did!” I’m slowly getting it. I’m appreciating the rest time, little by little. So when it happens, I’m like: “OKKKKKK. I guess I will!” So I’m getting it. Slowly. But first fighting it all the way, tbh. It’s a process. 🙈😂😷 #wednesdaywisdom